A Tengu Helps Tamiya Botaro Munechika Avenge His Father's Death, 1881

by Yoshitoshi (1839 - 1892)

Current Status

A Tengu Helps Tamiya Botaro Munechika Avenge His Father's Death, 1881 by Yoshitoshi (1839 - 1892)

Original Yoshitoshi (1839 - 1892) Japanese Woodblock Print
A Tengu Helps Tamiya Botaro Munechika Avenge His Father's Death, 1881

Series; Twenty-four Accomplishments in Imperial Japan

Twenty-four Accomplishments in Imperial Japan - Yoshitoshi's late series "Twenty-four Accomplishments in Imperial Japan" highlights important figures throughout the history of Imperial Japan, from both legend and real life. These terrific images include valiant samurai, brave retainers, loyal wives, and fantastic demons. Beautifully drawn with a wonderful sense of realism and finely printed with rich jewel-tone colors, these designs are a great example of Yoshitoshi's mature artistic style. A great choice for a Yoshitoshi collector.

A Tengu Helps Tamiya Botaro Munechika Avenge His Father's Death, 1881 - Great scene from the kabuki play "A Child's Revenge," based on a true story. As a young child, Tamiya Botaro's father was murdered by a fencing master. Botaro swore to avenge his father's death, and at the age of eighteen he accomplished his mission, killing the murderer. Here the young warrior kneels, his sword held upright, while a tengu, a long-nosed demon or spirit, hovers above to aid him in his honorable task. Tengu were renowned for their martial arts ability. Wonderful detail in the tengu's beard and hair and grizzled face. A terrific illustration from this famous tale.

Artist - Yoshitoshi (1839 - 1892)

Image Size - 13" x 8 3/4" + margins as shown

Condition - This print with excellent color and detail as shown. Horizontal centerfold. Large tear at corner, repaired. Slight soiling. Please see photos for details. Good condition overall.

A Tengu Helps Tamiya Botaro Munechika Avenge His Father's Death, 1881 by Yoshitoshi (1839 - 1892)
A Tengu Helps Tamiya Botaro Munechika Avenge His Father's Death, 1881 by Yoshitoshi (1839 - 1892)