The Humiliation of Kanshin, 1885

by Meiji era artist (unsigned)

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The Humiliation of Kanshin, 1885 by Meiji era artist (unsigned)

Original Meiji era Japanese Woodblock Print
The Humiliation of Kanshin, 1885

Comments - Intriguing scene of the future Chinese general Kanshin (Han Xin in Chinese) allowing himself to be humiliated by crawling through the legs of a fisherman. As a young man, a ruffian saw him carrying a sword and challenged him to either kill him with it, or crawl between his legs. Knowing that he would become a criminal if he killed the man, he humbled himself and crawled through the man's legs. After later becoming a brilliant military leader, he found the ruffian and appointed him a lieutenant, stating that by enduring that humiliation and not slaying his opponent, he had survived to accomplish great things in the future. Here, Kanshin scrambles along the ground as the fisherman lifts up his robe. The other fishermen jeer and point at him, and a woman laughs behind her hand. Fishing nets are strung out to dry from a pine tree at right, and one of the baskets on the ground is filled with fish. A fascinating historic subject, nicely detailed with burnishing in the black leather boots and fine bokashi shading in the sky, water, and ground.

Artist - Meiji era artist (unsigned)

Image Size - 13 1/2" x 27 3/4' + margins as shown

Condition - This print with excellent color and detail as shown. Three separate panels. Slight paper remnants on reverse from previous backing. Vertical fold at side of two panels. A few small wormholes, repaired. Slight soiling, a few creases and whitish spots. Please see photos for details.

The Humiliation of Kanshin, 1885 by Meiji era artist (unsigned)
The Humiliation of Kanshin, 1885 by Meiji era artist (unsigned)