Gion Shrine Gate, 1935

by Hiroshi Yoshida (1876 - 1950)

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Gion Shrine Gate, 1935 by Hiroshi Yoshida (1876 - 1950)

Original Hiroshi Yoshida (1876 - 1950) Japanese Woodblock Print
Gion Shrine Gate, 1935

Hiroshi Yoshida - Hiroshi Yoshida was one of the most famous woodblock print artists of the 20th century and a leader in the shin-hanga or new print movement in Japan. He and his son, Toshi, traveled Japan and the globe, examining and sketching the people and places around them. Best known for his beautiful landscapes, his prints are richly detailed and he was especially skilled at capturing the effects of light and reflections on water. After 1925, Hiroshi Yoshida began self-publishing his own works, hiring his own carvers and printers and supervising them very closely. He was a highly skilled carver and printer in his own right, using a special "jizuri" seal to denote the designs he worked on himself. His lovely woodblocks are beautiful examples of 20th century Japanese printmaking.

Comments - Wonderful scene of a woman carrying her child on her back in the courtyard outside Gion Shrine Gate. She smiles as they pause to watch the pigeons gathered on the ground, the child snuggly wrapped under her blue striped robe. Lovely detail in the elegant architecture of the gate, the building framed by tall pine trees. A charming design with beautiful soft color palette, in excellent condition. Pencil signed in bottom margin, with jizuri seal, meaning "self-printed," in the top left margin indicating that the artist approved the print himself as being of the highest quality.

Signed - Hiroshi Yoshida in pencil in bottom margin
Publisher - Self-published

Artist - Hiroshi Yoshida (1876 - 1950)

Image Size - 14 3/4" x 9 5/8" + margins as shown

Condition - Excellent overall with no issues to report.

Gion Shrine Gate, 1935 by Hiroshi Yoshida (1876 - 1950)
Gion Shrine Gate, 1935 by Hiroshi Yoshida (1876 - 1950)