Nitta no Yoshisada Offering His Sword to the Gods of the Sea Advertising Print

by Meiji era artist (unsigned)

Current Status

Nitta no Yoshisada Offering His Sword to the Gods of the Sea Advertising Print by Meiji era artist (unsigned)

Meiji era Japanese Lithograph Print
Nitta no Yoshisada Offering His Sword to the Gods of the Sea Advertising Print

Japanese Advertising Prints - Known as hikifuda, advertising handbills or circulars became popular in Japan beginning in the Edo era. Colorful, decorative designs with were printed with large blank areas for the merchant to add his store name and other information. While some featured specific products, most depicted beauties or Japan's famous Seven Lucky Gods and other auspicious imagery. Posters called ebira were pasted up at crossroads or in other busy locations. Ebira were also distributed to announce shop openings or as New Year's greetings. Favorite subjects for holiday ebira included the gods Daikoku and Ebisu with gold coins to ensure good fortune in the coming year. The Meiji-era advertising prints in this group come from a publisher's sample book, with binding holes at one side of the image and a stock number on the reverse. An intriguing area of Japanese prints, hikufuda are fun and unusual items to collect.

Artist - Meiji era artist (unsigned)

Image Size - 10" x 14 5/8" + margins as shown

Condition - This print with excellent color and detail as shown. Four binding holes or slits at edge. Slight toning. Some prints have spotting or soiling, a few have small tears at edges or creases. Please see photos for details. Generally in good condition overall.

Nitta no Yoshisada Offering His Sword to the Gods of the Sea Advertising Print by Meiji era artist (unsigned)
Nitta no Yoshisada Offering His Sword to the Gods of the Sea Advertising Print by Meiji era artist (unsigned)

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